Connecticut Will Permit Direct Shipping of Wine by Retailers in July

Alex Koral | June 13, 2019

Beginning July 1, 2019, Connecticut will become the latest state to permit the direct-to-consumer (DtC) shipping of wine by out-of-state retailers.

Governor Ned Lamont signed SB 647 on June 5. The new law amended many provisions of the state’s alcohol statutes, including the current rules for wineries’ DtC shipments of wine, which now include language opening the state to DtC shipping of wine by retailers.

Retailers looking to make DtC shipments of wine to Connecticut consumers will have to comply with the same regulations that have long applied to wineries. These include:

With the passage of SB 647, Connecticut joins the small, but growing, ranks of states that permit out-of-state retailers to make shipments of wine direct to consumers. Currently, the other states are: Alaska, Louisiana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming. (California, New Mexico, and Idaho also permit retailers in each others’ states to ship to their residents.)

The opening of another state to DtC shipping is part of a positive trend. By establishing rules and regulations for how retailers can join into the Connecticut DtC market, the state is enabling itself to effectively monitor, tax, and police that market. This, in turn, means the residents of Connecticut can legally access a national selection of wines that might otherwise not be made available locally.

Connecticut also raises excise taxes

In addition to SB 647, the governor signed HB 7427, the state’s budget. This bill includes a 10 percent increase on Connecticut’s excise taxes on wine and spirits, which will become effective October 1, 2019. Thereafter, the taxes on alcohol in the state will be as follows:

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